Windows 10 Upgrade and Dominance

You probably have seen all the reports about the success of Windows 10 already having more installs than every other Linux distro just based on the free upgrades. With over 14 million installs and very few, though some problems report Microsoft is likely going to have an OS that will finally eat and expand upon a larger user base than Windows 7, Windows 8 and possibly even the former Windows XP.  There is however a caveat to everyone who gets their free upgrade and that is the fact that Microsoft isn’t making money by giving away free upgrades.  They are making money now on your data that is being shared as a result of the free upgrades.

Windows 10 more so than any previous OS and with Cortana ties into their Windows Online Services, to have the functions work fully you need to be connected to a Windows Live / Xbox Live account and this is where data gets stored, tracked, consumed and shared for the same purpose that one would see with any service including Google, Facebook or others and that is to serve you better and more targeted ads.  To build more information for the big data engines to make sure you are presented with the stuff more likely to get you to click and buy.

The privacy settings by default, Wi-Sense and more are simply ways to subsidize and offset the fact that they are giving away the OS.  Do I see at some point in the future targeted popups on your Windows 10 OS like the free editions of Office applications or a Ad supported Kindle Fire?  Maybe, Maybe not.

Of course it makes a lot of sense to have a single OS, Microsoft says Windows 10 will be the last Windows Upgrade and version, meaning all future updates will just continue to update the existing Windows 10 adding features, functions, bug fixes…etc.  Though you still can use an offline user account in Windows 10 you lose access to many of the features like Cortana that depend on the Windows Live account.

So far the biggest issue that I have with Windows 10 is the removal of Recent Places from the Save As menu, it makes it harder if you frequently like to put files in your recent folders to do this.  Frequent Folders isn’t the same and not as good, and I can’t find a permanent work around to this so is just something to get used to unless Microsoft fixes it.

Overall though I do like Windows 10, disabled a lot of security features, including the Wi-Sense which is where Windows would automatically connect to common public trusted networks (trusted) being the key word here as in it isn’t you trusting it, it was a partnership deal where Microsoft says it’s trusted.  So this is worth disabling and this video tutorial shows you how to do that.

Have you upgraded to Windows 10 yet?  What are your favorite things so far, or what do you hate about it? Share your story!

 

Updated: August 4, 2015 — 3:15 pm